Writing Samples

Generations at Work

Zemke, Raines, and Filipczak’s Generations at Work focuses on defining generational differences in an organization and making these differences an organizational asset. The book discusses the Traditionalists (born before 1943), the Baby Boomers (born 1943-1960), the Gen Xers (born 1960-1980), and the Millennials (born 1980-2000). Traditionalists The Traditionalists were born at a pivotal point in human history, where society moved from an agrarian society to an industrial one. Some influential experiences of the Traditionalists include The Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, WWII, Nuremberg trials, the Korean War and the introduction of the color TV. Overcoming some of these wars made

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Bock’s “Work Rules” Examines What Google’s Work Culture Can Teach Us

Work culture has a significant impact on the success of a company, and the hierarchical structure of an organization has consequences that influence this culture. In Laszlo Bock’s Work Rules, he examines Google’s culture and the key units of its structure that allowed for an explosive growth. From the hiring process to the evaluation of a finished product, Bock fancies the implications of Google’s non-hierarchical and highly tactical organization. In the information age, where a company now relies on its organization’s creativity to stand out among its competition, this type of organization may be imperative for a company to succeed.

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Are You Singing The Wrong Words To That Song? | Mondegreens

Originally Published in Neat Writers To annoy my loved ones, I sometimes deliberately sing the wrong lyrics of a song that is playing. However, sometimes I really do mishear the lyrics and sing them how I thought I heard them. This mishearing is known as a mondegreen. These mishearings are homophonous phrases we interpret, which give the song a new meaning. An example of a mondegreen is found in Taylor Swift’s Blank Space. The actual lyrics say “Got a long list of ex-lovers”. However, at first hearing this, I, as well as countless others, heard “Starbucks lovers”. I found out

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America’s First Writer to Go Viral: Thomas Paine

Originally Published in Neat Writers Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an English-born politician, writer, and philosopher who helped define the sentiments of a pivotal time in American history—the Age of Revolution. He was a thinker far ahead of his time and envisioned the future of America, free from the oppression of the British rule. Paine immigrated to America after being introduced to Benjamin Franklin in London. Franklin suggested to Paine that he come to America and even gave him a letter of recommendation to facilitate his emigration. At the time, Paine was in a troublesome predicament, having lost his job, having

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“Arrival” Explores How Language Shapes Reality

Originally Published on Neat Writers The new movie Arrival, released Nov. 11, is a rare sci-fi thriller that puts a spotlight on linguistics. Based on Ted Chiang’s award-winning novella Story of Your Life, Arrival has fascinating twists, which revolve around the intricacies of language and the implications that language has on how we perceive reality. Linguistics professor Louis Banks, played by Amy Adams, is recruited by the U.S. military when 12 alien pods arrive landing on various regions around Earth, one landing in the United States of America. While the whole world is in a frenzy, nations panic to interpret

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Why We Procrastinate

Originally Published in Quo Vadis People tend to blame time for their lack of productivity. We can’t seem to get things done, and we often conjecture the falsely that we are deficient in our time management. Hours of my day have been spent watching YouTube videos, daydreaming about winning the lottery and doing other trivial activities. Meanwhile, my more important priorities were not met. I clearly have the time to finish my important tasks, but I choose to manage this time in a detrimental manner. It makes no sense, so why do we procrastinate? We procrastinate because we cannot manage

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Man’s Search for Meaning Book Review

Originally Published in Quo Vadis In his book “Man’s Search for Meaning,” Dr. Viktor Frankl discusses his experience as an inmate in one of Germany’s concentration camps during World War II. His observations of the hostile environment teach a telling lesson on the meaning of life, even after one has nothing left to lose. Frankl’s conclusion is clear; meaning can be found even in the most hopeless of places. This book is divided into two parts; the first being his account in these camps, and the other part on the psychological implications stemming from Frankl’s experience within these camps, with

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Fast Food Strikes

Originally Published in Quo Vadis This past week, fast-food workers have held strikes around some U.S. cities to protest the minimum wage and push for a higher wage. According to the Chicago Tribune, workers are demanding a wage of $15 an hour. Are they on to something, or are they being ridiculous in their demand? Yes, for some, making a living working at a fast-food restaurant may not be a prestigious job that will get them anywhere in life. However, many Americans depend on these jobs to make ends meet. How they got there is nobody’s business. These are individual

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More Efforts Are Needed to Conserve the African Elephant Population

Originally Published in Quo Vadis | Co-Authored with Paige Alonso With less than a million in population left, the African elephant is in danger of being the next animal on the endangered species list. In nearly 215 years the elephant population went from 26 million to fewer than 1 million. A large portion of this decline in population is due in part because of the demand for ivory. According to a new study mentioned on nationalgeographic.com ivory-seeking poachers have illegally killed over 100,000 African elephants between 2010 and 2012. According to theatlantic.com the tusks of a single adult elephant can

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Will NYC’s New Non-Bail Option Work?

Originally Published in Quo Vadis A court summons can be a ticket to a long ride through a system that doesn’t take into account how an individual’s income will affect the riders. Income inequality is not an excuse for breaking the law. However, it is not socially responsible to let those who can afford a first-class ticket have an easier ride than the low-income groups. A crime is a crime that should have punishments with the same applicability for any individual committing that crime. Unfortunately, we live in a society where the privileged receive unspoken rights that the general public

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Consent to Sex? There’s an App for That!

Originally published in Quo Vadis. In an effort to reduce false allegations of rape, We-Consent™, a new app, allows users to video record their consent to sex. The app works by asking the first user for their name and then asks the name of the suitor in interest. The suitor is informed that the original user is asking for consent as the back camera of the phone is pointed toward them. That partner can then decide to say “yes” or “no”. The videos are encrypted and kept for seven years. These records are only accessible to law enforcement through the

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